DEVELOPMENT OF A TABLET FORM OF LIU WEI DI HUANG EXTRACT

Authors

  • Vorawut Jearasakulpol Department of Pharmaceutical Science Faculty of Pharmacy Chiang Mai University
  • Pramote Tipduangta Department of Pharmaceutical Science Faculty of Pharmacy Chiang Mai University
  • Supanimit Teekachunhatean Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine Chiang Mai University
  • Natthakarn Chiranthanut Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine Chiang Mai University
  • Sunee Chansakaow Department of Pharmaceutical Science Faculty of Pharmacy Chiang Mai University

Keywords:

Liu Wei Di Huang, Chinese Traditional medicine, Tablets, Quality, Stability

Abstract

Objective: Develop an effective and stable tablet form of Liu Wei Di Huang (LWDH).

Methods: LWDH extract was obtained by decoction (TC) and reflux with water (WR). Extracts were concentrated and analyzed by HPLC-PDA using loganin as the bioactive marker. Adsorbents, tablet strength and friability, and tablet quality and stability were evaluated.

Results: Extraction of LWDH formula from raw materials using WR yielded higher concentrations of loganin than TC. The best formulation of LWDH tablets included Avicel®PH101, corn starch, purified talcum, magnesium stearate and Cab-osil® with about 97.40% of the label amount of active marker. Excluding moisture from the product reduced marker degradation, suggesting a product shelf life 12+months. Finished tablets were uniform in weight, friability, disintegrated in<30 min, had good microbial and heavy metal contamination safety profiles and was stable.

Conclusions: Extraction of LWDH formula using reflux with water produces higher yields than decoction. A suitable tablet formulation consists of dried water extract (38.83%), corn starch (29.13%), Avicel®PH101 (29.13%), purified talcum (0.97%), magnesium stearate (0.97%) and Cab-osil® (0.97%) prepared by wet granulation. Excluding moisture from the product reduces product degradation, suggesting a shelf life of 12+months. LWDH tablets avoid traditional formulation problems (high dosages, unacceptable taste and odor, lack of product uniformity, contamination with microorganisms and heavy metals), and are a good alternative for patients and TCM practitioners.

 

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Author Biographies

Vorawut Jearasakulpol, Department of Pharmaceutical Science Faculty of Pharmacy Chiang Mai University

Master degree student

Pramote Tipduangta, Department of Pharmaceutical Science Faculty of Pharmacy Chiang Mai University

Associate Professor in Pharmaceutical technology

Supanimit Teekachunhatean, Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine Chiang Mai University

Associate Professor in Pharmacology with Ph.D degree

Natthakarn Chiranthanut, Department of Pharmacology Faculty of Medicine Chiang Mai University

Pharmacology lecturer with Ph.D degree

Sunee Chansakaow, Department of Pharmaceutical Science Faculty of Pharmacy Chiang Mai University

Assistant Professor in Pharmacognosy with Ph.D degree

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Published

01-07-2015

How to Cite

Jearasakulpol, V., P. Tipduangta, S. Teekachunhatean, N. Chiranthanut, and S. Chansakaow. “DEVELOPMENT OF A TABLET FORM OF LIU WEI DI HUANG EXTRACT”. International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, vol. 7, no. 7, July 2015, pp. 275-81, https://www.innovareacademics.in/journals/index.php/ijpps/article/view/6391.

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Original Article(s)